Legislation and Computers – London Workshop

I (albeit remotely) participated in a Workshop in London on June 25, 2019 on Legislation and Computers. This meeting is part of ongoing developments by an international group of Parliamanetary Counsels to explore and discuss recent developments in machine-readable and executable legislation.

I gave my talk in conjunction with one of my collaborators Fraser Gough, Parliamentary Counsel of the Parliamentary Counsel Office, Scottish Government.

The program of the workshop is here and the slides of the talk are here.

Office of the Parliamentary Counsel, London

I had the opportunity to give a talk at the Office of the Parliamentary Counsel, London, on 21 May 2019 about a small pilot project done with colleagues in the Parliamentary Counsel Office of the Scottish Government.

The talk is about applying some LegalRuleML elements as annotations to a corpus of Scottish legislation, making the annotated documents accessible on the Web, then visualising and querying the corpus to access particularly relevant information from across the corpus.

The slides of the talk are available here.

Thanks especially to Luke Norbury for the kind invitation and to the audience.

CodeX Weekly Meeting

I spoke briefly at the online CodeX weekly meeting about small pilot project done with colleagues in the Parliamentary Counsel Office of the Scottish Government.

The talk is about applying some LegalRuleML elements as annotations to a corpus of Scottish legislation, making the annotated documents accessible on the Web, then visualising and querying the corpus to access particularly relevant information from across the corpus.

There were other excellent presentations by:

CodeX will make a recording of the session available.

The slides of my talk are available here. The talk is a shortened and slightly modified version of a talk at the Office of the Parliamentary Counsel, London.

Thanks especially to Jameson Dempsey at CodeX for inviting me to participate.

BiCi Seminar "Frontiers and Connections between Argumentation Theory and Natural Language Processing"

Bertinoro, Italy
Date
July 20th-25th, 2014
Location
Bertinoro International Center for Informatics (BiCi)
Bertinoro, Italy
The seminar will be held in the BiCi, which is located in the small medieval hilltop town of Bertinoro, Italy, about 50km east of Bologna. The town is picturesque. Meetings are held in an archiepiscopal castle that has been converted into a modern conference center.
Context
Large amounts of text are added to the Web daily from social media, web-based commerce, scientific papers, eGovernment consultations, etc. Such texts are used to make decisions in the sense that people read the texts, carry out some informal analysis, and then (in the best case) make a decision; for example, a consumer might read the comments on an Amazon website about a camera before deciding what camera to buy. The problem is that the information is distributed, unstructured, and not cumulative. In addition, the argument structure – justifications for a claim and criticisms – might be implicit or explicit within some document, but harder to discern across documents. The sheer volume of information overwhelms users. Given all these problems, reasoning about arguments on the web is currently infeasible.
A solution to these problems would be to develop tools to aggregate, synthesize, structure, summarize, and reason about arguments in texts. Such tools would enable users to search for particular topics and their justifications, trace through the argument (justifications for justifications and so on), as well as to systematically and formally reason about the graph of arguments. By doing so, a user would have a better, more systematic basis for making a decision. However, deep, manual analysis of texts is time-consuming, knowledge intensive, and thus unscalable. To acquire, generate, and transmit the arguments, we need scalable machine-based or machine-supported approaches to extract arguments. The application of tools to mine arguments would be very broad and deep given the variety of contexts where arguments appear and the purposes they are put to.
On the one hand, text analysis is a promising approach to identify and extract arguments from text, receiving attention from the natural language processing community. For example, there are approaches on argumentation mining of legal documents, on-line debates, product reviews, newspaper articles, court cases, scientific articles, and other areas. On the other hand, computational models of argumentation have made substantial progress in providing abstract, formal models to represent and reason over complex argumentation graphs. The literature covers alternative models, a range of semantics, complexity, and formal dialogues. Yet, there needs to be progress not only within each domain, but in bridging between textual and abstract representations of argument so as to enable reasoning from source text.
To make progress and realize automated argumentation, a range of interdisciplinary approaches, skills, and collaborations are required, covering natural language processing technology, linguistic theories of syntax, semantics, pragmatics and discourse, domain knowledge such as law and science, computer science techniques in artificial intelligence, argumentation theory, and computational models of argumentation.
Objectives and Outcomes
The objective of the seminar is to gather an interdisciplinary group of scholars together for an extended, collaborative discussion about the various aspects of connecting argumentation and natural language processing. The intended outcome of the seminar is a roadmap that outlines the state-of-the art, identifies key problems and issues, and suggests approaches to addressing them. More precisely, theseminar is conceived for the writing of a monograph “A Prospective View of Argumentation Theory and Natural Language Processing” that should become a standard reference in the field and should provide guidelines for future research by putting that activity in focus and identify the most significant research issues in combining these two research fields. This roadmap will have several sections authored by the participants at the seminar and edited by the seminar organizers.
Format and Process
The seminar will adopt a structure, where personal interaction and open discussion are prominent, emphasizing discussion of results, ideas, sketches, works in progress, and open problems. Participants will be requested to prepare individual contributions around specific topics (see a tentative list below) so that the outcome of the workshop will constitute a roadmap for the area to be published in the near future. The allocation of topics as well as the mechanism for compiling and elaborating contributions into a coherent draft — that will form the working document for the workshop — will be made known in a future communication to those individuals who accept to participate in this workshop.
Currently we have identified the following areas of research to be presented for discussion at the workshop (and we welcome suggestions about additional topics):

  • Automatic identification of argument elements and relationships between arguments in a document;
  • Argumentation and negation & contrariness;
  • Argumentation and discourse;
  • Argumentation and dialogue;
  • Approaches combining NLP methods and argumentation frameworks;
  • Creation/evaluation of high quality annotated natural language corpora to prove argumentative models on naturally occurring data, or to train automatic systems on tasks related to argumentation (e.g. arguments detection).
  • Applications of argumentation mining: summarization, extraction, visualization, retrieval;

Organizers
Elena Cabrio
INRIA Sophia-Antipolis Mediterranee, France
elena.cabrio@inria.fr
http://www-sop.inria.fr/members/Elena.Cabrio
Serena Villata
INRIA Sophia-Antipolis Mediterranee, France
serena.villata@inria.fr
http://www-sop.inria.fr/members/Serena.Villata
Adam Wyner
University of Aberdeen, Scotland
azwyner@abdn.ac.uk
http://wyner.info/LanguageLogicLawSoftware
Structure of Position Paper Submissions
Participants will be expected to submit position papers (with references) prior to the seminar. Submissions details will be discussed over the course of the seminar. The seminar organizers will facilitate a fruitful exchange of ideas and information in order to integrate the discussion topics.
Position papers should follow the two-column format of ACL 2014 proceedings without exceeding eight (6) pages of content plus two extra pages for references. We strongly recommend the use of ACL LaTeX style files. Submissions must conform to the official style guidelines, which are contained in the ACL style files, and they must be in PDF.
Subsequent to the seminar, draft roadmap documents will be circulated amongst the participants for further discussion and prior to submission for publication. We plan to publish the roadmap in a volume of the CEUR workshop proceedings series. In addition, we have a journal that has agreed to publish a special issue based on expanded and revised versions of the material presented at the workshop.
Organizational Issues
The total registration fees for each person for the whole stay (arrival Sunday evening – departure Friday after lunch) are 600 Euro. Participants pay their own costs; however, organizers are seeking funding to defray the expenses. We will update as information becomes available. Fees include seminar registration, accommodation, WiFi and meals (included an excursion and the social dinner).
BiCi Registration
Shortlink

Presentation at LaTeCH 2014 on "Text Analytics for Legal History

Swedish Coast
The Swedish Coast
At the EACL 2014 Workshop Language Technology for Cultural Heritage, Social Sciences, and Humanities (LaTeCH), I’m presenting a paper on A Text Analytic Approach to Rural and Urban Legal Histories. Link to the presentation below.
A Text Analytic Approach to Rural and Urban Legal Histories
The ACL publication appears on
http://www.aclweb.org/anthology/W/W14/W14-0614.pdf
This is the bib reference

Paper Accepted to LaTech 2014 Workshop at EACL

My colleagues and I have had a paper accepted to EACL 2014 workshop on: Language Technology for Cultural Heritage, Social Sciences, and Humanities, which has a special theme on linked data in the Humanities. The workshop is April 26 2014 in Gothenburg, Sweden.
Gothenburg, Sweden
Text Analysis of Aberdeen Burgh Records 1530-1531
Adam Wyner, Jackson Armstrong, Andrew Mackillop, and Philip Astley
Abstract
The paper outlines a text analytic project in progress on a corpus of entries in the historical burgh and council registers from Aberdeen, Scotland. Some preliminary output of the analysis is described. The registers run in a near-unbroken sequence form 1398 to the present day; the early volumes are a UNESCO UK listed cultural artefact. The study focusses on a set of transcribed pages from 1530-1531 originally hand written in a mixture of Latin and Middle Scots. We apply a text analytic tool to the corpus, providing deep semantic annotation and making the text amenable to linking to web-resources.
Bibtex
Shortlink to this page.
By Adam Wyner

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Presentations about "A Text Analytic Approach to Rural and Urban Legal Histories"

I’ve made several related presentations about the dot.rural project A Text Analytic Approach to Rural and Urban Legal Histories. The project started March 1, 2014. Links to the presentations below.


Sir Duncan Rice Library, Aberdeen
Archivists Meet Up
Aberdeen Council Archives, University of Aberdeen Archives, dot.rural Investigators
University of Aberdeen, Sir Duncan Rice Library, Aberdeen
January 21, 2014
A Text Analytic Approach to Rural and Urban Legal Histories


St Trinneans Room, Pollock Halls, Edinburgh
Workshop
Scotland’s Collections and the Digital Humanities
St Trinneans Room, Pollock Halls, Edinburgh
February 14, 2014
Supported by the Royal Society of Edinburgh
A Text Analytic Approach to Rural and Urban Legal Histories



dot.rural Meeting
MacRobert Building, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen
February 21, 2014
A Text Analytic Approach to Rural and Urban Legal Histories


A shortlink to this page
By Adam Wyner

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Auxiliary Materials for COMMA 2014 Submission

This page is a ‘stub’ for the paper, presentation, additional graphics, discussion, and implementation for:
An Isomorphic Encoding of Propositional Calculus as an Argumentation Framework
Adam Wyner and Federico Cerutti
Under review
Abstract
The paper introduces AF_PC, which directly encodes the Propositional Calculus (PC) as a graph in a Dungian argumentation framework (AF) without instantiating arguments of PC as abstract arguments and without acceptability conditions. The truth tables of PC statements isomorphically correlate to stable extensions of the AF_PC. We translate PC formulae to AF_PC, give the semantics, and discuss logical consequence. Thus, we can reason in PC using the AF_PC as a computational model even in the face of inconsistent knowledge bases. AF_PC is thoroughly defined, and the isomorphism is proven.
Presentation
Graphics
Implementation
Federico Cerutti has written an implementation that translates formulae of PC into an AF_PC graph. This implementation is available HERE.
Shortlink to this page.